Syllabus

Academic Honesty and Integrity Statement Not only does the University view academic dishonesty as one of the most serious offenses that a student can commit while in college, but, as your instructor, I want you to know that I also take this offense very seriously. 1 2 In addition to abiding by the expectations of the University, as a future project manager, you will also need to abide by PMI’s Code of Ethics & Professional Conduct (http://www.pmi.org/About-Us/Ethics/CodeofEthics.aspx), which includes an honesty section very similar to the academic honesty principles outlined by NEU. PMI’s Code states: “As practitioners of project management, we are committed to doing what is right and honorable. We set high standards for ourselves and we aspire to meet these standards in all aspects of our lives.” (PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct, Section 1.1) Regarding honesty, this code reminds us that as project practitioners, we are obligated NOT to “engage in or condone behavior that is designed to deceive others…” but to “make commitments and promises, implied or explicit, in good faith”. (PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct, Section 5.2 & 5.3) Please understand that I will not tolerate any instances of academic dishonesty in this course. If I suspect a student of violating our academic policy, I will notify the student and give them a chance to review my concerns. If I am not completely satisfied that there was no violation of the policy, I will refer the student to the Office of Student Conduct & Conflict Resolution (OSCCR) and in most cases, the student will immediately be given a failing grade for the course. Students will not be allowed to repeat an assignment or in any way make up for the violation. There is no excuse for academic dishonesty. Please make sure that you completely understand what is expected of you. Academic honesty means being truthful at all times in your communications and in your conduct. It also means letting your instructor know if you are aware of any instances of academic dishonesty, even if you were not involved in the dishonest actions. While the following is not an all-inclusive list, I hope this will help you to understand some of the things instructors look for. The following is adapted from the University’s policy on academic honesty and integrity; the complete policy is available at http://www.northeastern.edu/osccr/academicintegrity/index.html Cheating – intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in an academic exercise of any type. This may include use of unauthorized aids (notes, texts), or copying from another student’s exam, paper, computer disk, etc. Fabrication – intentional and unauthorized falsification, misrepresentation, or invention of any data, or citation in an academic exercise. Examples include making up data for a research paper, altering the results of a lab experiment or survey, listing a citation for a source not used, or stating an opinion as a scientifically proven fact. Plagiarism – intentionally representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in any academic exercise without providing proper documentation of the source by way of a footnote, endnote, or inter-textual note. Selfplagiarism (resubmitting materials from another course or course section as new work) is also prohibited unless specifically authorized, in writing, by the instructor. Unauthorized collaboration – Students, each claiming sole authorship, submit separate reports, which are substantially similar to one another. While several students may have the same source material, the analysis, interpretation and reporting of the data must be each individual’s alone. Note that if two students turn in the same paper, both students will be punished, regardless of which student did the work. NOTE: Unauthorized collaboration also includes lending your work to another student directly or indirectly. You may help fellow students by explaining concepts to them or suggesting additional reading, but not by giving them your work, examples of your work, or answers to specific questions or exercises. You may NOT, for example, lend papers, discs, computers, flash drives, or any other version of your work to other students. 2 3 If another student copies your work, even without your permission, you will also be charged with academic dishonesty. You are expected to safeguard your work. (Also see the section on “participation in academically dishonest activities below”). Participation in academically dishonest activities – Examples include stealing an exam; using a prewritten paper obtained through mail order or other services; selling, loaning or otherwise distributing materials that might facilitate cheating, plagiarism, or other academically dishonest acts; alternation, theft (including the unlawful use of copyright materials), forgery, or destruction of the academic work of others. Facilitating academic dishonesty – Examples may include inaccurately listing someone as co-author of paper who did not contribute, sharing a take home exam, taking an exam or writing a paper for another student, or uploading materials to websites that may be used to facilitate academic dishonesty. Withholding information about dishonesty – not notifying your instructor immediately after observing a real or potential act of academic dishonesty. Examples include, but are not limited to: (1) seeing other students take an exam together in the library or elsewhere, even if you took the exam by yourself; (2) working with a team member who tells you that the part of the team report they submitted was written by someone not on the team; (3) knowing that a student or other individual has uploaded course materials to a website, blog, or other electronic storage location; or (4) knowing that a student has told the teacher they couldn’t come to class because they were sick when you know this isn’t true. PJM6000 – Course Prerequisites PJM 5900 – You must have taken, completed, and passed this course. If you have not, then it is highly likely that you will do poorly in PJM 6000 OR • At least 2-3 years of professional experience directing and leading project tasks. Student Competencies: • Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Power Point are used throughout. Students are expected to be proficient in the use of these programs. • Students will be expected to use APA Sixth Edition writing standards. Required Textbook(s), Articles and Materials The following are texts required materials for this course: 1) A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, 6th edition. Project Management Institute, 2017. ISBN: 978-1-62825-184-5 2) Project Management: The Managerial Process, 7th Edition. Gray, C.F. & Larson, E.W. ISBN: 978-1-259-66609-4 3) Williams, T. (2007). Post-Project Reviews to Gain Effective Lessons Learned. Project Management Institute. ISBN: 978-1-933890-24-1 4) Sixth Edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, ISBN: 1- 4338-0561-8 3 4 Software & Related Equipment Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint Student Competencies: • Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Power Point may be used throughout. Students are expected to be proficient in the use of these programs. • Students will be expected to use APA Sixth Edition writing standards. Learning Outcomes Based on satisfactory participation in this course, a student should be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of basic project management concepts by: a. Defining & distinguishing between projects, programs, and portfolios b. Describing the importance of project management c. Using the PMI Project Management framework d. Describing the effect of organizational structure on project management 2. Using real world examples of projects, demonstrate an ability to manage the Initiating process group by: a. Preparing or working with a business case b. Identifying key elements of the business case c. Researching and assessing environmental factors that will impact the business case 3. Using real world examples of projects, demonstrate an ability to manage the Planning process group by: a. Preparing a Project Charter document b. Creating a Scope Statement c. Evaluating processes to identify information that should be input into the Project Carter d. Describing the roles and responsibilities of the project team and project manager e. Evaluating the importance of the Project Charter and its linkage to project initiation approval 4. Using real world examples of projects, demonstrate an ability to manage the Executing and Monitoring and Controlling process groups by: a. Measuring project success b. Making cost, time, and/or scope adjustments as needed c. Describing the Integrated Change Control process 5. Using real world examples of projects, demonstrate an ability to manage the Closing process group by: a. Describing administrative project closure tasks b. Describing how to conduct a Lessons Learned and how to work with the results of this process. 6. Creating a curriculum map that outlines the student’s progression throughout the program. Course Methodology Each week typically begins on Monday and ends on Sunday, except for: The first week, which begins on a Tuesday due to the President’s Day holiday and ends on Sunday, and The final week, which begins on Monday and officially ends on Saturday. Beginning on Monday of each week, you will: 45 5 1. Review the week’s learning objectives. 2. Complete all assigned readings. 3. Complete all lecture materials for the week. 4. Participate in the Discussion Board. 5. Complete and submit all assignments by the due dates. Please note that written work needs to be clear, comprehensible, and competently produced at a graduate level as noted below.

Academic Honesty and Integrity Statement (Second inclusion in this syllabus) Not only does the University view academic dishonesty as one of the most serious offenses that a student can commit while in college, but, as your instructor, I want you to know that I also take this offense very seriously. In addition to abiding by the laws of the university, as a future project manager, you will also need to abide by PMI’s Code of Ethics & Professional Conduct (http://www.pmi.org/About-Us/Ethics/Code-of-Ethics.aspx), which includes an honesty section very similar to the academic honesty principles outlined by NEU. PMI’s Code states: “As practitioners of project management, we are committed to doing what is right and honorable. We set high standards for ourselves and we aspire to meet these standards in all aspects of our lives.” (PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct, Section 1.1) Regarding honesty, this code reminds us that as project practitioners, we are obligated NOT to “engage in or condone behavior that is designed to deceive others…” but to “make commitments and promises, implied or explicit, in good faith”. (PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct, Section 5.2 & 5.3) Please understand that I will not tolerate any instances of academic dishonesty in this course. If I suspect a student of violating our academic policy, I will notify the student and give them a chance to review my concerns. If I am not completely satisfied that there was no violation of the policy, I will refer the student to the Office of Student Conduct & Conflict Resolution (OSCCR) and in most cases, the student will immediately be given a failing grade for the course. Students will not be allowed to repeat an assignment or in any way make up for the violation. There is no excuse for academic dishonesty. Please make sure that you completely understand what is expected of you. Academic honesty means being truthful at all times in your communications and in your conduct. It also means letting your instructor know if you are aware of any instances of academic dishonesty, even if you were not involved in the dishonest actions. While the following is not an all-inclusive list, I hope this will help you to understand some of the things instructors look for. The following is adapted from the University’s policy on academic honesty and integrity; the complete policy is available at http://www.northeastern.edu/osccr/academicintegrity/index.html Cheating – intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in an academic exercise of any type. This may include use of unauthorized aids (notes, texts), or copying from another student’s exam, paper, computer disk, etc. Fabrication – intentional and unauthorized falsification, misrepresentation, or invention of any data, or citation in an academic exercise. Examples include making up data for a research paper, altering the results of 16 a lab experiment or survey, listing a citation for a source not used, or stating an opinion as a scientifically proven fact. Plagiarism – intentionally representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in any academic exercise without providing proper documentation of the source by way of a footnote, endnote, or inter-textual note. Self-plagiarism (resubmitting materials from another course or course section as new work) is also prohibited unless explicit permission for its reuse is approved by the instructor in writing. Unauthorized collaboration – Students, each claiming sole authorship, submit separate reports, which are substantially similar to one another. While several students may have the same source material, the analysis, interpretation and reporting of the data must be each individual’s alone. Note that if two students turn in the same paper, both students will be punished, regardless of which student did the work. NOTE: Unauthorized collaboration also includes lending my work to another student. I know that I may help my fellow students by explaining concepts to them or suggesting additional reading, but not by giving them my work, examples of my work, or answers to specific questions or exercises. I won’t, for example, lend my papers, discs, computers, flash drives, or any other version of my work to other students. I know that if they copy my work, even without my permission, I will also be charged with academic dishonesty. I know that I’m expected to safeguard my work. (Also see the section on “participation in academically dishonest activities below”.) Participation in academically dishonest activities – Examples include stealing an exam; using a prewritten paper obtained through mail order or other services; selling, loaning or otherwise distributing materials for the purpose of cheating, plagiarism, or other academically dishonest acts; alternation, theft (including the unlawful use of copyright materials), forgery, or destruction of the academic work of others. Facilitating academic dishonesty – Examples may include inaccurately listing someone as co-author of paper who did not contribute, sharing a take home exam, taking an exam or writing a paper for another student. Withholding information about dishonesty – not notifying your instructor immediately after observing a real or potential act of academic dishonesty. Examples include: (1) seeing other students take an exam together in the library or elsewhere, even if you took the exam by yourself, (2) working with a team member who tells you that the part of the team report they submitted was written by someone not on the team, or (3) hearing a student tell the teacher they couldn’t come to class because they were sick when you know this isn’t true. Student Support Software & Related Equipment Blackboard Collaborate – this free software provides text chats, audio chats (if you have a headset), whiteboard sharing, and most importantly, screen sharing. You can download this free from the Tools link on the left column at our Blackboard course site. A noise-canceling headset (headphones plus noise-canceling microphone) will allow you to speak with me using Blackboard IM. Headsets can be purchased from online vendors for about $30. Microsoft Project 2010 or 2013 – There is no recent version available for the Mac, but you may use one of the campus computers which provide access to MsProject. This software may also be used in a Windows virtual environment on the Mac. MS Project 2013 is the recommended version. Instructions for obtaining a copy of MS Project are posted in the course. 17 Computer access – the InfoCommons in the Snell library can be used 7 days a week. The library may also have laptops, etc. available for short-term loan. See: http://www.lib.neu.edu/ Communication resources If you need help to improve your written communication, the following free resources are available: Smarthinking (available free in Tool section of Blackboard) – this allows students to submit personal written material in any subject and have it reviewed by an e-instructor within a 24-hour window (in most cases). The Purdue Online Writing Lab (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/) provides free writing resources with help in grammar, sentence structure and general writing skills NEU Writing Center – To learn more about what the Writing Center has to offer, please see: http://www.northeastern.edu/english/writing-center/ ESL Language Co-op tutoring – is a free service that international students (both undergrad and grad) are welcome to use. This service allows students to work 1:1 with ESL trained writing specialists. You can sign up for one-hour sessions by accessing this website: (http://neu.mywconline.net/) and making an online appointment. International Tutoring Center – is dedicated to providing international students with free, high-quality English language instruction and support in Snell Library, Room 088. To sign-up for an appointment, visit http://neu.mywconline.net/ for instructions. PJM Tutor – the CPS Advising Office has recently started to offer the services of a dedicated PJM tutor on a limited basis. Contact your Academic Advisor for further information. If you have difficulty with oral presentations, then you may want to explore resources such as the Northeastern University “Toastmasters” Club. Northeastern University Online Policies and Procedures For comprehensive information please go to http://www.cps.neu.edu/online/ Technical Support Blackboard 17 Get immediate 24/7 technical support for NU Online (CPS Blackboard) by calling 855-836-3520 or email NUOnline@neu.edu. For answers to common questions you may also visit the NU Online support portal at: http://smartipantz.perceptis.com/neu/content/default.aspx If you encounter any technical issues, please open a ticket with NUOnline before contacting me and provide the name of the contact person and case number (if applicable). 18 General Technical Support For computer access, the InfoCommons in the Snell library can be used 7 days a week: http://www.lib.neu.edu/ For MyNEU issues and other technical support questions, please contact the University help desk by calling 617-373-HELP (4357) or email help@neu.eduTITLE IX Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects individuals from sex or gender-based discrimination, including discrimination based on gender-identity, in educational programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance. Northeastern’s Title IX Policy prohibits Prohibited Offenses, which are defined as sexual harassment, sexual assault, relationship or domestic violence, and stalking. The Title IX Policy applies to the entire community, including male, female, transgender students, faculty and staff. If you or someone you know has been a survivor of a Prohibited Offense, confidential support and guidance can be found through University Health and Counseling Services staff (http://www.northeastern.edu/uhcs/) and the Center for Spiritual Dialogue and Service clergy members (http://www.northeastern.edu/spirituallife/). By law, those employees are not required to report allegations of sex or gender-based discrimination to the University. Alleged violations can be reported non-confidentially to the Title IX Coordinator within The Office for Gender Equity and Compliance at: titleix@northeastern.edu and/or through NUPD (Emergency 617.373.3333; Non-Emergency 617.373.2121). Reporting Prohibited Offenses to NUPD does NOT commit the victim/affected party to future legal action. Faculty members are considered “responsible employees” at Northeastern University, meaning they are required to report all allegations of sex or gender-based discrimination to the Title IX Coordinator. In case of an emergency, please call 911. Please visit www.northeastern.edu/titleix for a complete list of reporting options and resources both onand off-campus. Copyright Statements Northeastern University Online is a registered trademark of Northeastern University. PMBOK is a registered mark of the Project Management Institute, Inc. 19 All other brand and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies. This course material is copyrighted and Northeastern University reserves all rights. No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any language or computer language, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, magnetic, optical, chemical, manual, or otherwise, without the express prior written permission of Northeastern University. Copyright 2016 © by Northeastern University All Rights Reserved The Instructor reserves the right to modify the course syllabus at any time.