Week 2: Assignment List

Instructions: The following paragraphs contain errors of several sorts. First look for sentence punctuation errors (fragments, comma splices). Then check to see if you can spot any of the errors you know you make in your own writing. Finally, proofread one last time for spelling. Use Track Changes to correct the errors. Please save this document (last name, first name) and upload it to the digital drop box.

1. Editing and Proofreading Exercise 1:

To enhance my ego, I tell little white lies to my friends. “I am the best football player in town”; is an example of a little white lie I tell. I tell this lie to my friends so they will think I play football well. It does not matter that the last time I played football, I fumbled the ball six times, threw three interceptions, and scored a touchdown for the opposing team. If a little white lie is available, and my friends will believe it, I will use a little white lie to avoid embarrasment, and to inflate my ego. When a friend ask me how my date with Marcia was; I certainly will not tell him the truth: that she dropped me flat for some football player. I will tell a little white lie, to inflate my ego, and say: “Marcia and I had a great time together,” or “I broke up with Marcia, she’s too ugly, I have a better looking girlfriend now.” I will not tell the truth and damage my ego when a little white lie can mask the truth and magnify my ego. To avoid embarrasment and to protect my ego; I tell little white lies to my freinds.

2. Editing and Proofreading Exercise 2:

My Mother’s Ideas About Marriage and My Own

My mother and me gets along pretty well. The reason we do is that me and her have alot of respect for one another, and sticks to this respect; even when we don’t have quite so much respect for each others ideas. If you didn’t respect one another, you’d argue a lot about ideas. For instance, we don’t think at all the same about marriage. Take the whole idea of getting married, we start our differences there. My mother is all for it, she thinks everyone ought to be marry. If theres a adult over the age of twenty-five who wasn’t married, my mother started trying to find somebody for them. In her eyes, nobdy is a citizen, a complete person, or even a respectable human being, unless they are married. I don’t say marriage isn’t all right, for the right people but I could imagine going through life without ever experience it. I certainly won’t be married at twenty-five. When it comes to premarital sex. There again we part company. My old-fashioned mother believes in virginity for girls and a little discreet experience for boys, she wants her daughters to march down the aisle in white satin that means one hundred percent pure guarantee and her sons to have a good time and then settle down with girls like that. This is not for me; I believe in living with you for a while before even thinking about marrying you. Shes also old fashion about fidelity and divorce after marriage, while I’m not. She wants no adultery and no divorce. If anyone can ever makes it living like that once, which I doubt, they certainly can’t do it today. If I get married I’ll give it my best try, and any deal I make I’ll intend to keep but if I find I’m married to a welcher someone who don’t keep the other end of the bargin, why should I be stuck for life. Luckily, as I said my mother and I love and respect one another, she doesn’t push her beliefs on me and I don’t flaunt mine in front of her. In the end, I hope her faith in me will always be justify but I doubt that I’ll be doing the marriage bit her way.

3. Plagiarism Exercise 1: Please read the original source material carefully and then select the entry, either “A” or “B,” that you think has not been plagiarized.

Original Source Material:  A naïve mental model in the context of computer programming is that a computer is an intelligent system, and that giving directions to a computer is like giving directions to a human being.Source: Merriënboer, J. J. van. (1997).Training complex cognitive skills.Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications.
A)  One kind of mental model for the computer is the naïve model. A naïve mental model in the context of computer programming is that a computer is an intelligent system. This model is naïve because giving directions to a computer is like giving directions to a human being. References: Merriënboer, J. J. van. (1997).Training complex cognitive skills. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications.B)  One kind of mental model for the computer is the naïve model. According to van Merriënboer (1997), “A naïve mental model in the context of computer programming is that a computer is an intelligent system, and that giving directions to a computer is like giving directions to a human being” (p. 145).References: Merriënboer, J. J. van. (1997).Training complex cognitive skills. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications.
Original Source Material: By instruction I mean any deliberate arrangement of events to facilitate a learner’s acquisition of some goal. The goal can range from knowledge to skills to strategies to attitudes, and so on. The learners can be adults or children of any age, background, or prior experience. The setting in which learning takes place can be formal, school-based, on-the-job, or in the community – wherever programs for learning are being designed and implemented.Source: Driscoll, M. P. (2000). Psychology of learning for instruction (2nd ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
A)  The definition of instruction is broad, including any deliberate arrangement of events to facilitate a learner’s acquisition of some goal, including the learning of:Knowledge Skills  Strategies Attitudes (Driscoll, 2000)References: Driscoll, M. P. (2000). Psychology of learning for instruction (2nd ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.B)  Driscoll (2000) defines instruction broadly as “any deliberate arrangement of events to facilitate a learner’s acquisition of some goal” (p. 25). She includes learning knowledge, skills, strategies and attitudes in a partial list of possible goals for learning.References: Driscoll, M. P. (2000). Psychology of learning for instruction (2nd ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

4. Plagiarism Exercise 2: Write two-to-three sentences summarizing the information below in your own words with proper citations.

Original Source Material: Interactive multimedia instruction brings mediated instruction from more than one source to bear on an instructional problem which the learner experiences as integrated (although sometimes complex) medium. We can think of it in terms of many single inputs, with one multi-channel output. The instruction may contain motion images from a video disc, computer animation, text screens, and sound from a compact disk, for example, but the instruction is a tapestry woven from these sources. The learner experiences the tapestry, not the individual threads.Source: Schwier, R., & Misanchuk, E. (1993). Interactive multimedia instruction.Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications.

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